Moo Moo, Monsters & Middle Grade Books!

This is the week in review! Check out @storymamas on Instagram and Twitter to learn more about our picks this week! week 3 story mamas review

Fish in a Tree

Moo Moo in a Tutu
Wolfe the Bunny
The Lion Inside
My Teacher is a Monster
Tek- The Modern Cave Boy
#authorsaturday Elise Gravel

Week in Review

#storymamasbookaday #authorsaturday

Here are the books we recommended this week. Also, follow us on Instagram and/or Twitter @storymamas to find out why we loved these books!

week 2 blog storymamas

A Sick Day for Amos McGee – Philip C. Stead

https://instagram.com/p/BUE5elaBqwv/

Pass It On Sophy Henn
Zoe’s Rescue School – The Puzzled Penguin
Counting Crows – Kathi Appelt
The Donut Chef – Bob Staake
Happy Dreamer – Peter Reynolds
# authorsaturday – Jennifer L. Holm

Two Weeks in Review…

We’ve shared the following books to start up our newest hashtag #storymamasbookaday


I Wish You More by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Tom Lichtenheld

Curious George Goes to the Bookstore by Margret & H.A. Rey’s

El Perro con Sombrerro by Derek Taylor Kent and Jed Henry

Adopt a Glurb by Elise Gravel

Dragons Love Tacos 2 The Sequel by Adam Rubinstein and Dan Salmieri

Knuffle Bunny by Mo Willems

Real Friends by Shannon Hale and Leuyen Pham

Good News, Bad News; Look; Ah Ha; Frog and Fly by Jeff Mack

The Airport Book by Lisa Brown

Mouse Makes Words by Kathryn Heling, Deborah Hembrook and Patrick Joseph

Red Riding Hood, Superhero by Otis Frampton; Ninja-rella by Joey Comeau and Omar Lozano; Snow White and the Seven Robots by Louise Simonson and Jimena Sanchez; Super Billy Goats Gruff by Sean Tulien and Fern Cano

Mine by Jeff Mack

Little Red Gliding Hood by Tara Lazar and Troy Cummings

Strictly No Elephants by Lisa Mantchev and Taeeun Yoo

Mother Bruce, Hotel Bruce and Be Quiet by Ryan T. Higgins

#storymamasbookaday

It’s been two weeks Stories About Stories has been sharing a book a day on Instagram and Twitter @storymamas. If you aren’t already following make sure you do! We hope you’ve enjoyed hearing about some of the books we are reading and loving right now.

What is one book you didn’t know about before that you’re excited to read with your children or your students?

I Wish You More

Here is the journey of how the book  I Wish You More  by Tom Lichtenheld and Amy Krouse Rosenthal, came into my life and has stayed in my heart. If you haven’t read it, please put it on your shelfie (a term I use for my mental shelf of books I want to read).

I first heard about the book on the Nerdy Book Club blog in May of 2015. As soon as I read that post I knew I had to get a copy and read it immediately.

Life got in the way for the next two weeks and then I was gifted the book for my birthday from co-blogger Ashley and another friend. I read the book for the first time to my son, who was then about 9 months. He sat there on my lap quietly I read each brilliant page aloud. As I turned to see what was next the tears started to form. “I wish you more umbrella than rain”. The tears came slow and steady as each page made me feel like I wanted to be the best person I can be, for myself and my son. After I finished the book I gave him a big hug and said “ I wish you more hugs than ughs”

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As much as I love this book, I have to admit I can’t read it everyday, it would be one when I was looking for hope, love or inspiration.

Almost two years later, on the night I get home from the hospital after having my second son, comes the death of Amy Krouse Rosenthal. A true loss to the children’s literature world. I knew that for our first night as a family of 4 we would have to read  I Wish You More.  Having both boys on the couch next to me, again, tearing up as I read this book. “I wish you more can than knot”.

The book is simple yet makes so many wonderful emotions come through the page in both the words and illustrations. I hope you take the time to read it and let me know your favorite wish is from the book.

As we all have busy lives, in the words of Tom Lichtenheld and the late, great Amy Krouse Rosenthal “I wish you more pause than fast forward”

 

Books That are Better Than TV…

Where’s Waldo…remember this awesome book as a kid?

A few months ago my nieces, nephews and my kids were altogether. This doesn’t happen often so it was a treat to spend time together. My favorite parts of the day where when we would wind down and read together. Since my kids are the youngest, many of my nieces and nephews took turns reading to my boys. We brought out our old copies of the Where’s Waldo series, the ones my sister and I would sit around for hours trying to find Waldo, the Wizard and all the missing items. These types of interactive books are awesome! Pop-up books have always been a favorite in my house since my three year old was small enough to interact with books. He still loves the pop-up books but now there are so many books that go beyond those classics; they give you something to explore, problem solve and think about it in a new way. Here are a few of my favorite interactive books:

Let’s Play by Herve Tullet (or any of his books)

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The Odd One Out, Where’s the Pair and Where Did they Go? by Britta Teckentrup 

Move by Lolly Hopwood and Yoyo Kusters

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Spot It! by Delphine Chedru

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Who Done It? and Who What Where? by  Olivier Tallec

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Where’s Walrus and Where’s Walrus & Penguin by Stephen Savage

Before After by Matthias Arégui and Anne-Margot Ramstein
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This is Not a Book by Jean Jullien

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One Thousand Things: learn your first words with Little Mouse by Anna Kovecses

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Giant Squids in the Library

Last spring I was able to attend the School Library Journal’s Day of Dialogue.  img_5133The book nerd inside of me jumped for joy when I was approved to go to the conference with my librarian friend.  It was a day spent listening to authors, filling my bags with their latest ARCs, and having a chance to meet and chat with some of them.  Many of these books have found their way to my classroom library bookshelves, including the book Giant Squid.  Written by Candace Fleming, or better known as “The Muncha! Muncha! lady in our house, Giant Squid is a wonderful narrative non-fiction text.  My students love reading about “gross” things, and this book presents the facts in an engaging, accessible picture book with dark, realistic pictures by Eric Rohmann, which only add to the mysterious feel of the giant squid.  Books like this should be on the shelves of classroom libraries in every school.   

And lucky for me, I work in an amazing school district that values the importance of rich literature in the classroom. While finishing up the tail end of my maternity leave, I noticed a small blurb at the end of an email about book purchases, make a list, get a P.O., etc., etc., etc.  I found myself rereading the email…money for books?  Sign me up!  As it turns out, each teacher was given a generous amount of money that we can spend as we choose to purchase books for our classroom libraries.  I love shopping for books and have been scouring websites over the past few weeks and have found some amazing titles to add to my already plentiful library.

Building up and maintaining a classroom library is a labor of love, and can easily put you in some serious debt. However, over the course of my fourteen years of teaching, I’ve found that having a well-stocked, relevant library makes a world of difference.  In some areas that I taught, the books taken home from my library were the only books in that child’s household.  I had one student that would bring home picture books so his younger, non-school aged sibling could have books to read. I also spend a lot of my free time reading the books that I have in my collection so I can talk the books up to students, make appropriate recommendations, and have meaningful conversations about books. I recently turned a student onto a series that was screaming his name and by doing so, I helped a reluctant reader become a child that couldn’t put his book down.

I’m proud of my library. Just this year, another staff member walked into my room and commented on what an impressive classroom library I have. Another teacher used to send one of her students over to borrow a book. If I expect my students to become voracious readers, then I have to provide them with the means to get there. As my newest selections arrive in the mail, I plan on reading as many as I can so I can recommend them to my students with confidence.  And so I can enjoy them, too.  

Need help building your library up without spending your entire paycheck?  Here’s some frugal tips.

1.  Your local library.  Most public libraries have a section where donated books are for sale, and in most cases, you can buy them used for a quarter. We typically go to the library every week, and it’s become our routine to look for books for “mommy’s classroom”. Just today I found a Minecraft book. A quarter well spent.

2.  Annual public library book sales. My library has a huge fundraiser every year where they have a book sale for a couple of days. Same great 25 cent price, just a much bigger selection.  I’ve checked out ones in neighboring towns, as well, and found one that would probably rival any other sale. My very pregnant self waddled out of there this past fall with as much as I could carry. I’ll have a better plan of attack this coming year.

3.  Garage sales.  I scour garage sales over the summer. Most books are inexpensive and they are in great shape because, chances are, their kid read them only once. I also look on a lot of the Facebook virtual yard sale sites. Almost every town has them. I look at what people have posted, and I also specifically ask for books that I’m looking for. Last year I scored about ten “Who Was…” books for less than a dollar per book.

4.  Scholastic warehouse sales. Twice a year, typically around the winter holidays and as school is getting out in June, Scholastic will have its warehouse sale.  All books are on sale for 50% off, minus a handful of exceptions. If that’s not enough, there are coupons, and perks if you sign up to volunteer. A $10 gift certificate for each hour you volunteer can really help.

Building up a classroom library doesn’t have to happen overnight and it doesn’t have to cost you a fortune.  If you have any other tips on how your have filled your shelves with books, I’d love to hear!